Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Comparing Moz and Majestic SEO Metrics with Boxplots

By Neep Hazarika November 28, 2013

In this article, we will perform a simple exploratory analysis of the distribution of  link metrics, and introduce the reader to the concept of box plots. A comparison will be made among the quality metrics of MajesticSEO and MOZ.

Boxplots

A box plot (also referred to as a box and whisker plot or box chart) is a graphical representation of… Continue reading

Posted In: Research

Twitter Rankings!

By Dixon Jones October 17, 2013

Now Majestic has been able to rank the to 70 Million Twitter profiles based on how influential they are. You can download the top 50,000 for free.

Ever wondered who’s more influential on TWITTER, Lady Gaga or Barack Obama? Well as of today, Majestic thinks it is Obama…. just about:

Posted In: Research

Some Useful Excel Templates

By Neep Hazarika October 9, 2013

Compare two Lists

Compare two lists.

Compare two lists.

Sometimes, it may be necessary to compare data between two columns  in an Excel spreadsheet. It is particularly important, when analysing backlinks for example, to de-duplicate lists of data into some kind of useful list of domains that is easier… Continue reading

Posted In: Research

Correlation and Data Transformations

By Neep Hazarika September 26, 2013

In this article, we will show how data transformations can be an important tool for the proper statistical analysis of data. The association, or correlation, between two variables can be visualised by creating a scatterplot of the data. In certain instances, it may appear that the relationship between the two variables is not linear; in such a case, a linear correlation analysis may still… Continue reading

Posted In: Research

Majestic SEO Beginners Guide to Correlation: Part 5

By Neep Hazarika August 16, 2013

Review of Previous Parts

In Part 1, we described how two datasets can have strong, weak or no correlation depending on how the points in the resultant scatter plot are located relative to one another along a straight line. In keeping with conventional practice, the two variables are often referred to separately as X, with sample values x1, x2, … , xn, and Y… Continue reading

Posted In: Research